Suitable foods & ingredients whilst on a gluten free diet + what to avoid

What can gluten free people eat?

So you want to know
what can gluten free people eat?



Within this blog post I’ll answer some questions you might have about what types of foods and ingredients people who are gluten free can and cannot eat.



I’ll provide you with helpful lists and plenty of advice for any food or ingredient which is commonly confusing for someone new to gluten free (or someone whose cooking for someone gluten free!).






I’m sure you’ll find this one helpful, and please leave me questions in the comments or contact me over on Instagram if there’s anything else you want to know 🙂





Instagram:
@gemma.hartshorn


Thanks for your read,
as always.

Gemma x

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    What can gluten free people eat?

    Foods/Ingredients that are sometimes gluten free

    What are foods that do not contain gluten?

    What foods/ingredients do you avoid on a gluten free diet?

    What foods are high in gluten?

    What are the worst foods for gluten?

    What cannot be gluten free?

    DISCLAIMERS & DISCLOSURES

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    DISCLOSURE
    & my full Disclaimer for further information – DISCLAIMER

    Any advice offered within this article is meant for educational purposes only and should not be used as a sole resource for understanding the medical conditions discussed within. Any changes made to your diet, lifestyle and general well-being should be discussed with your GP or similar healthcare professional who is aware of your unique medical history and not made according to advice provided within this article or anywhere else on this website.


    While the utmost care has been taken in devising the information residing on this website, it is your sole responsibility as the reader to utilise the information as you see fit and by reading the information present on this website you accept personal responsibility over any health outcomes related to you and your condition which occur as a direct or indirect result of using the information on this website in any way.

    Always Check Ingredients Labels for Allergen Information
    before consuming a product.

    This is important in case there are changes in
    manufacturing since the date of publication of this article.

    It’s also a good idea in general, especially if you have allergies rather than intolerances/sensitivities to certain ingredients to check ingredients labels before consuming a product.

    What can gluten free people eat?
    What can gluten free people eat?

    What can gluten free people eat?

    Here’s an A-Z list of foods and ingredients which gluten free people can eat, so long as they’re in their unprocessed, natural forms. If they’re not, then you must consult the ingredients label before consuming it to check if it’s gluten free or not.


    See below this list for examples of other foods/ingredients to check.

    Agar

    All types of meat & poultry

    – All fruits and vegetables

    – All nuts, including nut flours


    Almond Milk – usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    Any naturally gluten free flour – check if labelled gluten free – if it’s not, consider if there’s a cross-contamination risk from farming processes before consuming

    Amaranth

    – Banana Milk –
    sometimes gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Beans
    – not including baked beans, which need to be checked

    Buckwheat – yes, it is definitely gluten free despite its misleading name

    Butter

    – Buttermilk –
    usually gluten free, but check ingredients label and allergen statement

    Carageenan

    – Cashew Milk
    – usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Chestnut

    – Coconut Milk –
    usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement-

    – Corn (maize)

    – Cream (all dairy and non dairy versions) –
    usually gluten free, but check ingredients label and for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    Crème Fraiche (dairy and non dairy versions) – usually gluten free, but check ingredients label and for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Fish

    – Flax/Flaxseed/Linseed

    – Flaxseed Milk –
    usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    Ghee – usually gluten free, but check ingredients label and for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    Goats Milk – usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Gram flour/Besan

    – Hazelnut milk –
    usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Hemp

    – Hemp Milk –
    usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Hops

    – Ketchup –
    some are gluten free, but you’ll need to check the ingredients labels and for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Lentils

    – Macadamia Milk –
    usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Maize (corn)

    – Mayonnaise (Egg versions and Vegan versions) –
    usually gluten free, but check ingredients label and for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Milk (cows milk only) –
    see rest of list for information on specific plant, nut and rice milks

    – Millet/Bajra

    – Mustard –
    jarred mustard sauces should be checked for gluten ingredients

    – Oats
    – oats are gluten free, but they’re often contaminated with gluten during farming processes – also, some people who react to gluten also react to oats because the proteins within each are similar. Eat gluten free labelled oats to avoid cross contamination risks and keep a note of how you feel after eating them in case you are someone who reacts to the protein in oats in the same way as gluten proteins from wheat, barley and rye.

    Oat Milk – not suitable unless the product specifies that it’s gluten free

    Oils – olive oil, vegetable oil, canola oil, sunflower oil, sesame oil, peanut oil, avocado oil, walnut oil, grapeseed oil, corn oil, soybean oil, safflower oil, coconut oil (flavoured oils may have added gluten ingredients, so be sure to check the ingredients before you consume it)

    Pasta – specified gluten free versions only or naturally gluten free pastas such as buckwheat pasta, and red lentil pasta, so long as there’s no cross-contamination risk on the allergen statement

    – Peanut Milk – usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Peas

    – Pea Milk –
    usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Pistachio Milk –
    usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Polenta

    – Potato’s

    – Pulses (beans, lentils, peas)

    – Quinoa

    – Quinoa Milk –
    usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Rice

    – Rice Milk –
    usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Sago

    – Sesame

    – Sesame milk
    – usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Sorghum/Sorghum malt

    – Soya

    – Soya Milk –
    usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    – Tapioca

    – Teff

    – Urd/Urid/Urad flour –
    check for cross contamination risk on the allergen statement

    – Walnut Milk –
    usually gluten free, but check for cross contamination risks on the allergen statement

    what can gluten free people eat?

    This article may also be helpful to you:

    What does gluten free
    actually mean?

    – Click to be taken
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    Foods/Ingredients that are sometimes gluten free:

    (Which you need to check the ingredients labels and allergen statements of to find out)

    Barley Malt Flavouring/Barley Malt Extract/Barley Malt Vinegar
    safe if product is labelled gluten free


    Breaded/Battered meats and fish
    some use gluten free breadcrumbs and others don’t

    Jams, spreads, sauces, baked beans and packaged soups
    Products like these tend to have wheat flours and other similar ingredients that contain gluten, so always check before consuming

    – Oats

    look for a gluten free label to avoid cross contamination risks

    – Naturally gluten free flours

    check for gluten free label to avoid potential cross contamination risks

    – Ice-creams

    Frozen chips, Yorkshire puddings, pizzas, pies and pastries
    look for a gluten free version/label

    what can gluten free people eat?
    What can gluten free people eat?

    Here’s an article you might also find helpful:

    What Breakfast Cereals are Gluten Free?

    What are foods that do not contain gluten?

    Foods that do not contain gluten are these foods in their natural, unprocessed form: meat, poultry, vegetables, fruits, nuts, buckwheat, flax/linseed, amaranth, agar, corn (maize), quinoa, pulses (peas, lentils, beans), potato’s, rice, mustard, millet/bajra, polenta, sorghum, soya, teff, tapioca, sago, gram flour (besan), hemp, hops, chestnut, cassava (manioc), carrageenan, sesame, urad flour/urid/urd. Processed foods can also be gluten free, but you’ll need to check their ingredients lists, allergen statements for any cross-contamination risks and for gluten free labelling.

    Here’s links to my recipe sections:

    If you want gluten free breakfast & brunch recipes,
    head to this section of my website.

    If you want gluten free dinner recipes,
    you can try these of mine.

    Or, if you want gluten free pudding ideas,
    head over here.

    what can gluten free people eat?

    Here’s another I think you’ll love:

    Which plant-based milks
    are gluten free?

    What foods/ingredients do you avoid on a gluten free diet?

    If you’re on a  gluten free diet, here’s an A-Z list of ingredients you’ll need to avoid in foods, unless they’re a specifically made gluten free version, or they’ve been processed in such a way as to lessen or remove the gluten content making it safe to eat on a gluten free diet and are labelled gluten free (see notes within the list):

    – Barley

    – Barley Malt Extract/Barley Malt Flavouring/Barley Malt Vinegar
    – avoid unless the product is labelled gluten free – if labelled gluten free, they’re using less than 20ppm of it which is the legal limit it can contain and still be gluten free – if there’s no gluten free label and it’s used, you’ve no idea how much they’ve used – it’s therefore not possible to say whether it’s suitable for someone whose gluten free and so, you shouldn’t eat it

    – Bulgar Wheat

    – Couscous – gluten free versions are now becoming available in free from sections in supermarkets

    – Durum Wheat

    – Einkorn


    – Emmer


    – Freekeh


    – Khorasan Wheat (Kamut)


    – Pearl Barley


    – Rye


    – Semolina


    – Spelt


    – Triticale


    – Wheat


    – Oats
    – normal oats are often contaminated during farming processes so you’ll need to source a gluten free version in order to eat oats on a gluten free diet

    What can gluten free people eat?

    – Click to be taken
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    Here’s another article I think you’d like to read:

    Which Recipe Box Company is Best when You’re Gluten free?

    What foods are high in gluten?

    A food product will always list its ingredients from highest content to lowest content, therefore anything with gluten ingredients listed at the beginning of the label will have a higher gluten content than one that lists it near the end of the ingredients list. As a general rule though, foods such as these listed below are higher in gluten than most other foods (unless they’re a gluten free version):

    Pasta

    – Bread & most Baked Goods like it


    – Pastries


    – Pies


    – Pizza


    – Cakes & Biscuits


    – Gravies
    – shop bought

    – Breakfast cereals –
    Weetabix has probably got the highest as it’s made almost entirely of wheat

    – Breaded/Breadcrumbed or Battered foods


    – Anything cooked in a hot oil fryer that has previously been used to cook gluten foods


    – Some processed meats – sausages, chorizo, etc
    .

    – Crisps


    – Pre-packed sandwiches and wraps

    Here’s another helpful article you’ll like:

    Which Soups are Gluten Free?

    What are the worst foods for gluten?

    The worst foods for containing gluten are things such as: pasta, bread, cakes, biscuits, pizzas and pastry items as well as most baked goods. These items generally include wheat flour and other gluten ingredients and are those which you’ll most commonly need to source or make a gluten free version of if on a gluten free diet.

    What can gluten free people eat?

    What cannot be gluten free?

    It’s not that there are foods which cannot be gluten free, but there are foods which there aren’t gluten free versions of yet as well as other products which aren’t widely available, and so we may not have come across them. Some examples of items you might not easily find a gluten version of, if at all, include:

    Shreddies

    – Couscous


    – Large Pre-made Pies


    – Noodles


    – Cup-a-soups


    – Instant Dinners/Ready Meals


    – Pre-made Stocks & Gravies


    – Large Frozen Pastry Puddings


    – Breakfast Cereals –
    there are a fair few which you won’t find an exact gluten free match for, although in general there are loads of gluten free cereals available these days

    Fajita Kits

    – Multipacks of Crisps
    – a tip: don’t look for crisps just in free from sections because many crisps are already gluten free and sit amongst the usual crisp aisle of supermarkets

    – Chocolate Bars –
    there are a few which you might struggle to find, especially in multipack form although in general there are a fair few gluten free chocolate bars available in free from sections these days

    – Certain Pastas –
    I’ve never found cannelloni tubes in gluten free form, for example, at least not in any supermarket I’ve visited recently

    – Click to be taken
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    You might also like this article:

    Aldi’s “hidden” gluten free products unveiled

    Gemma Hartshorn

    Gemma is a mum to twins with non-coeliac gluten sensitivity and has been living a gut-health focused life for many years herself. She has 5 years adult nursing experience in the UK and achieved a distinction in her Diploma of Higher Education in Healthcare from Oxford Brookes University. She is currently completing a BSc in Health Science and has a keen interest and knowledge of all things gut health. Listen to her Gut Be Good podcast or join her on the Gut Be Good youtube channel for more insights, sharing and helpful information on all things gut health related alongside her website here. Contact Details: glutenfreeshopeasy@gmail.com Unit 80366, PO Box 6945, London, W1A 6US

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